A Different Kind of Spring

Spring is most definitely in the air. The mornings are full of light, bird song and the sound of lambs calling for their mothers. The crocuses are out along with the grape hyacinths, the tulips are throwing up tall healthy stems and the slugs are enjoying my scented hyacinths which are just starting to poke their heavenly heads above ground (meaner slugs). Strangely enough we don’t have any daffodils in our garden but I am enjoying watching their trumpets glow as they come out in all their glory in the field across the road.

Along with all these beautiful delights Mother Nature graces us with, we’re all sick! Having been in the house since Tuesday evening, the sunshine fooled us into thinking we could venture out for the afternoon to Fota House and Gardens. Inbetween showers (even hailstone) the light was glorious and the sky was clear blue.

As Fota House and Gardens are home to some of the most rare and tender species of plant grown in Ireland I’m afraid I’m stumped when it comes to the names of them. If you know them, please let me know and I’ll add them to the pictures.

Apparently there is a dog house on the grounds that is an exact replica of Fota House. Does anyone know if this is true? I would love to find it!

The Pleasure Gardens and Fota House aren’t open just yet but it’s definitely a worth a walk around. While the Gardens are free, there is an entrance charge to the house and €3 parking fee. Of course if you get there early enough there’s always time for a visit to Fota Wildlife Park.

View of the pond
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Bridge
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Pond and bridge
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Moss
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Side gate
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Close up of gate
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Furry Magnolia bud
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Pink bud
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Magnolia flowers and buds
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Light on Magnolia bud
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Amazing how quickly the sky changes
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White Magnolia peaking through
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The Orangery
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Pink Bloom – Possibly a Korean Spice Viburnum
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Grevillea
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The Glass roof in the Orangery
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Side of the Orangery with fern and hellebore
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Back of the Orangery
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Bud
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Hamamelis (witch hazel)
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Lots of buds
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Another Viburnum
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4 responses to “A Different Kind of Spring

  1. Love the close up of the moss! Like an alien species. Signs of spring seems to be a tiny bit earlier in Ireland than accross the puddle in the UK at the moment. Although today I’ve seen lots crocuses, winter aconites and clusters of snowdrops. πŸ™‚

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    • My favourite too πŸ™‚ Ireland is really odd. Actually Cork is. My parents live 11 miles from me and they have a totally different climate. My mum usually plants things three weeks later than us. We are very sheltered so can get away with earlier sowings etc.

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  2. Hey, I didn’t know you had a 550D. πŸ˜‰ Great posts (all 3). Great photos ! (Love the ivy shot at Doneraile). Thanks for the wonderful visits. πŸ™‚

    Pink Bloom (no idea) –> I’m guessing korean spice viburnum
    Another nameless flower –> Grevillea
    Another unusual one –> Hamamelis (witch hazel)
    The last one looks like another viburnum.

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    • Hi Miss M, only just spotting this comment now! Yes, I do have a 550D but sometimes when I’m out with T on my own it can get awkward. At least I can just shove the iPhone into my pocket if needs be πŸ™‚

      Thanks for the flower names! I shall go edit

      x

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